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Jennifer Zorotovich, Ph.D. Awarded Outstanding Scholarship Article

Jennifer Zorotovich, Ph.D., assistant professor of child and family development in the School of Human Ecology, is a recipient for Outstanding Scholarship Article in the Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences (JFCS) at the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) 108th Annual Conference and Expo in Dallas, Texas.

“I was extremely honored to be recognized in this way, especially by such a long standing organization that represents the foundation and cohesion for Georgia Southern University’s School of Human Ecology,” said Zorotovich. “It is rewarding to have my hard work and dedication acknowledged on a national platform.”

The JFCS is a peer-reviewed journal published quarterly by the AAFCS, and the Outstanding Scholarship Article is a national award with the goal of advancing the profession through scholarship. A committee of seven AAFCS members was appointed to distinguish one article that has made a notable contribution to the field and is a reputable model for future submissions.

The committee awarded “Perceived Social Standing and Weight-Related Outcomes in Adolescents” co-authored by Zorotovich, Elizabeth I. Johnson, Ph.D., Carol A. Costello, Ph.D., Naima Moustaid-Moussa, Ph.D., Betty Greer, Ph.D., R.D., Eugene Fitzhugh, Ph.D., and Marsha Spence, Ph.D., who were all faculty members at the University of Tennessee when the article was submitted.

Zorotovich’s research focuses on how influential factors intersect with social status and manifest across developmental stages. The study, which Zorotovich considers the foundational component to her research agenda, examined the effect of social standing on adolescents’ weight and weight perceptions.

“The project was among the first I used to explore the multicontextuality and multidimensionality of human development and was the starting point for my journey into expanding my conceptualization of well-being,” stated Zorotovich.

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Posted in Awards, Faculty Highlights, School of Human Ecology